Saturday, January 2, 2010

wadi rum

hi all I am a local directory in the area of Wadi Rum
Who wants to visit this region I am ready to receive
I would be keen to enjoy the trip

For communication and inquiries

wadirum2010@yahoo.com

And those who do not know Wadi Rum, I hope that enjoy this explanation


About wadi rum

Wadi Rum is a protected area covering 720 square kilometers of dramatic desert wilderness in the south of Jordan. Huge mountains of sandstone and granite emerge, sheer-sided, from wide sandy valleys to reach heights of 1700 meters and more.



Narrow canyons and fissures cut deep into the mountains and many conceal ancient rock drawings etched by the peoples of the desert over millennia. Bedouin tribes still live among the mountains of Rum and their large goat-hair tents are a special feature of the landscape.
There are many ways to enjoy the attractions of Rum, including jeep, camel and hiking tours and you can stay overnight in a Bedouin tent and gaze at the amazing panoply of stars.

To safeguard its unique desert landscape, Wadi Rum was declared a protected area in1998 and an intensive conservation programme is now underway.


Bedouins:

Virtually all the people living in and around Wadi Rum are of Bedouin origin and, until recently, led nomadic lives, relying on their goat herds. They belong to seven tribal groups, of which the three largest are the Zalabia tribe who make up the majority of people living in Rum Village (see Rum map); as Rum village is the only village inside the protected area; the Zalabia tribe is largely responsible for tourism services and operate many of the jeep and camel tours. These services are organized through the Rum Tourism Cooperative, a locally run society that shares the tourism business between the villagers.


The other prominent tribal group is the Zweideh tribe, based in the villages of Disi on the northern edge of the protected area. They also run tourism services, including campsites and vehicle tours. Zweideh are not entirely dependent on tourism for their livelihood, having access to a large underground water source that enables them to practice profitable agriculture

Other tribes are Sweilhieen, Omran, Godman and Dbour tribes. They live in different villages depending mainly on livestocks raising and partially on tourism.

Even though most local Bedouin have become villagers, they still maintain goat herds for milk, meat and 'jameed', a type of yoghurt. For parts of the year, some families or family members return to a wandering existence with their flocks. Few, however, are able to continue a truly nomadic existence today and the traditional Bedouin lifestyle is fast disappearing



Exploring the protected area:

You can explore Wadi Rum in several ways: by jeep, by camel, by horse or on foot. If you want more challenging pursuits like climbing and trekking,


Jeep tours are the quickest way to see the well-known scenic and archaeological sites. There are 19 of these sites of interest and it is possible to visit any combination in a single tour. Tours start from the visitor centre, where you can choose one of 9 tour packages, lasting from 2 hours to full day. Longer trips can be arranged. Most vehicles are pick-up trucks operated by local Bedouin cooperatives. They are characterful and fun but only have modest levels of comfort. Private 4 x 4 vehicles and tour company fleet-vehicles can enter Rum, provided they follow all regulations.

Camel rides are a popular activity and short trips can be arranged on demand from the visitor centre. There are also 9 tour packages visiting the main sites of
interest, which last between 1hr to full day. Overnight trips and long treks are possible on request.








Hiking is possible throughout the protected area but maps and details are still difficult to find. Bedouin guides can be arranged if pre-booked and there are two "easy" trails leading from the visitor centre, one short and one long, promoted by the Protected Area Management.
































Transferee from the site of WadiRum.jo

Thursday, December 24, 2009